03 | graphic design & fashion
August. 2018
Rebelle




“Rebelle” is a project which was born from the Experimental Type class at ArtCenter College of Design. “Rebelle” can be understood as exploring and practicing typography through fashion and clothing. From a more macro standpoint in the fashion industry, “Rebelle” is a graphic designer’s response to the wide-spread notion of breaking the boundary between high fashion and streetwear. It is essentially an upper level streetwear (also called “luxury streetwear”) created by a Gen Y generation designer, revealing the will to be part of other existing luxury streetwear brand explorers, such as Off-White, Vetements, Undercover, John Elliott, and Fear of God.

The project contains clothing designs, fashion photography, a promotional video, stationery, the brand catalogue with a line-sheet, a brand manual, a packaging design set, and collateral. The core design philosophy of Rebelle is using typography as the primary approach to deliver direct and indirect communication to a broader audience then the Gen Y perspective. For Rebelle, typography is an intrinsically aesthetic language carrying meaning and content through various mediums, such as clothing, jewelry, books, posters, motions, etc. One major design approach is to use words, sentences, and paragraphs along with powerful imagery to directly present Rebelle’s audience with seasonal themes. Rebelle also inspires, presenting its own attitude and raising specific social topics through indirect communication like using subtexts conveyed by paralanguage. This can be largely found in Rebelle’s “Ré•volution” campaign posters, such as “This Is Not a Rebellion” and “This Is Not an Execution”. By placing the word “Re•volution” up-side down shows a parallel with many Renaissance paintings used, indicating information could only be seen by God. Using imagery is the secondary approach for Rebelle to communicate with its audience. For Rebelle’s first season (“Rebelle Collection” and “Ré•volution” Collection), it is applying paintings and visual elements from the Romanticism period to imply that rebellions have occurred throughout human history. Each period has its own type of rebellion. Three Romanticism paintings that documents the revolutions occurred in Spain, France and Belgium are, “The Third of May 1808” (by Francisco Goya), “Liberty Leading the People” (by Eugène Delacroix), and “Episode of the Belgian Revolution of 1830” (by Gustaf Wappers).  

Rebelle’s tone is established as a nostalgic sensation mainly by a set of 80s–90s color palette in contrast to the overall sophisticated design and tender visual execution. Fashion photography is a major part of “Rebelle” achieved with the help of a professional photographer, a fashion stylist, a hair & make-up artist (HMUA) and two professional models. The emergence of Rebelle can be seen as a millennial’s response to contemporary graphic and fashion designs. It can be also understood as a brave reaction to the counterculture that keeps breaking the boundaries between luxury and streetwear. In fact, Rebelle may be seen as an idea that “officially” makes graphic design and fashion design collaborate with each other. Rebelle, as a newborn fashion brand with a graphic spirit, reveals a sense of unruliness, rebellion, and optimism that have long been in existence. Additionally, it is an expression of its own type of millennial zeitgeist somberness and effervescence.




Art Direction: Yi Mao
Photography: Charlie Sin
Stylist: Sondra Choi
HMUA: Shu Zhang
Model: Kaylin & Pierce (Wilhemina)
*specially thanks to Chelsea Phuong and Oriana Ren. 


*DISCLAIMER: This project is not for any types of commercial uses. 

Instructor: Cheri Gray 
Text Editing & Instructor: Polly Geller
Client: ArtCenter College of Design

*for further and more comprehensive information & imagery, please visit https://www.behance.net/gallery/70755539/Rebelle